Dr. Battista joins Orthopedic Associates of Lancaster from Huntington, West Virginia following a distinguished career in the United States Army.

Board certified and fellowship-trained hand and upper extremity surgeon, Dr. Battista specializes in hand and wrist trauma, shoulder replacement, elbow reconstruction and nerve injuries. 

He says the best part of his job is helping improve the quality of life for his patients.

  • Undergraduate Education: Mount Saint Mary's College, Emmitsburg, MD
  • Medical School: Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C.
  • Internship: Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Aurora, CO
  • Residency: William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Ft Bliss, TX
  • Fellowship: Hand Fellowship Training Walter Reed Medical Center Nation Consortium, Washington, D.C.
  • Licenses: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
  • American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Subspecialty Board Certified in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine
  • Pennsylvania Orthopedic Society Board of Directors
  • North Pointe Surgery Center
  • Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health
  • Orthopedic Associates of Lancaster, Ltd.
  • Marshall Orthopaedics at Marshall University
  • United States Army – Chief Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hand Surgery Services, 2007-2009
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • American Society of Surgery of the Hand
  • Effect of Nicotine patch on vascular Repair in a Smoking Rat Model.  Microsurgery 28: 179-181, 2008.  
  • Pediatric Trigger finger: Case Report and Review of the literature. J Hand Surg [Am]. 2007 Dec;32(10):1558-9
  • Conversion of Metacarpal Phalangeal Joint Arthrodesis to Implant Arthroplasty: A Case Report. J Hand Surgery November 2006
  • Comparison of four Measurements for Scapholunate instability. Journal of Clinical Anatomy: Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy. March 2006
  • A Technical Note on Percutaneous Fixation of the Scaphoid. Journal of Trauma. September 2005
  • Asynchronous Bilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture Associated with Androstenediol. American Journal of Sports Medicine. November 2003
  • Safety and Efficacy of Intra-articular Hip Injections. Clin Orthop 391, October 2001
  • Injuries in a UH-60 Midair Collision. Military Medicine, September 1999
  • Effects of three types of Casts on Forearm Rotation. Presented at Barnhard Research Meeting. Denver CO 1994
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common problems affecting the hands. The condition occurs when the carpal tunnel becomes narrow, or when tissues surrounding the tendons swell. This results in pressure on the median nerve that causes painful numbness and tingling. Endoscopic carpal…

  • Many elbow conditions can be treated using elbow arthroscopy. This form of surgery involves using small incisions, or portals, to allow a surgeon to see inside the elbow joint with a telescopic camera. It is less invasive than open surgeries and, because of the smaller incisions, there is often…

  • Your elbow is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, and it is the origin of the muscles that move your wrist and forearm. Overuse, trauma, and congenital defects can alter the mechanics of your elbow causing instability and pain. In some of these instances, elbow reconstruction surgery…

  • Bones are ridged but when an outside force is applied, they can bend or break. While splinting or casting is enough for many fractures, severe breaks may require fracture surgery.

    Fracture surgery is dependent on the force of trauma and how the bone breaks. In some cases, it can take…

  • Golfer’s elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis, is a painful form of elbow tendonitis. While common among golfers, this condition can affect anyone engaged in repetitive or overuse of the tendons located in the inner elbow. These tendons are responsible for gripping, wrist flexion, and arm…

  • Knee arthroscopy, also known as a knee scope, is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that your orthopedic surgeon may use to evaluate a variety of conditions affecting your knee joint. Knee arthroscopy can be used to address ACL tears, meniscal tears, and remove loose bodies in the…

  • Knee ligament injuries, such as a torn ACL, are very painful. Your knee contains four ligaments that provide stability. Tears of the ACL or PCL do not typically heal well on their own. If you are young and active, your orthopedic surgeon may recommend surgery or knee ligament reconstruction for…

  • Minimally invasive knee replacements are performed to alleviate chronic knee pain due to arthritis. The surgery requires the cutting of soft tissue and bone to implant prosthetic knee joint components. Minimally invasive knee replacement uses a smaller skin incision and tends to require less…

  • Your bones, muscles, and joints – along with their supporting structures such as tendons, ligaments, nerves, and cartilage – make up the musculoskeletal system. Maintaining a healthy system along with individualized musculoskeletal care can prevent and alleviate injuries to help reduce pain and…

  • In a reverse shoulder replacement, the surgeon performs just the opposite. The glenoid part (socket) of the new joint is attached to the end of the humerus, and the ball portion of the joint replaces the old shoulder socket.

    Traditional shoulder replacement surgery involves replacing the…

  • The shoulder joint and surrounding group of four muscles is referred to as the rotator cuff. These muscles work together to allow for elevation and rotation of the arm with power. Tears in the rotator cuff are a common source of shoulder pain. Tears can be minor and occur from trauma such as a…

  • Shoulder arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure. It may be used to evaluate your shoulder joint, diagnose injuries, and repair damage. Arthroscopy can be used to repair many causes of shoulder painincluding rotator cuff tears, bicep tendon procedures, and removal of bone…

  • Total knee replacement surgery is safe, reliable and durable. Knee problems can occur from injury, aging, “wear and tear,” or disease, such as arthritis. Arthritis causes joint pain, stiffness, and swelling affecting cartilage in the knee joint. Cartilage is a very tough, shock absorbing…

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