Fracture Surgery

Bones are ridged but when an outside force is applied, they can bend or break. While splinting or casting is enough for many fractures, severe breaks may require fracture surgery.

Fracture surgery is dependent on the force of trauma and how the bone breaks. In some cases, it can take several weeks to several months to heal depending on the extent of the injury. Pain usually stops long before the fracture has healed enough for you to regain normal activity. It is not uncommon to lose some muscle strength in the injured area while you recover. Our physical therapists will work with you to develop a recovery plan including exercises designed to help you restore normal muscle strength, joint motion, and flexibility.

Most fracture surgeries can be performed on-site at North Pointe Surgery Center. Our state-of-the-art surgical facilities include orthopedic surgical rooms, pre and post-operative rooms, and pain management services.

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  • Closed reduction surgery when the fracture has displaced or is angulated. This procedure uses a hematoma block to inject local anesthesia into the fracture site.
  • Reduction internal fixation surgery when the fracture is in several pieces. Bone fragments are repositioned into their normal alignment and a plate is placed over the fracture site. Screws or pins are used to hold the plate to the surface of the bone. In some cases, a metal rod, also known as an intramedullary nail, may be inserted down the center canal of the bone.
  • Open reduction internal fixation when the skin and other soft tissue around the fracture are badly damaged. In this case, an external fixator may be applied until surgery can be tolerated. Metal pins are placed in the bone above and below the fracture site. These pins are then connected to a metal bar outside the skin. This acts as a stabilizing frame that will hold the bones in proper position while they continue to heal.
  • External fixation when immediate stabilization is required. Metal pins are placed in the bone above and below the fracture site. These pins are then connected to a metal bar outside the skin. This acts as a stabilizing frame that will hold the bones in proper position while they continue to heal.
Fracture Surgery Providers

Adam E. Hyatt, M.D., FAAOS

Sports Medicine, Hip

Adam T. Griska, M.D.

Hand & Wrist, Elbow

David D. Sieger, M.D.

Foot & Ankle, Knee

Gregory A. Tocks, D.O.

Joint Replacement

James H. Carson, M.D.

Trauma, Joint Replacement

Joel A. Horning, M.D.

Sports Medicine

Kathryne J. Stabile, M.D., M.S.

Sports Medicine, Shoulder

Michael W. Gish, M.D.

Sports Medicine

Paul F. Carroll, M.D.

Sports Medicine, Knee

Vincent Battista, M.D.

Hand & Wrist, Elbow
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  • I had my left shoulder worked on and the surgery was very successful. I do not have any limitations or pain now. I would use this group again for any orthopedic issue I may have in the future, because they CARE about your success.
  • #1 in my book!  This team replaced my right knee, and are now in the prep stages to replace the left one. One stop shopping as far as diagnosis, actual surgery at Lancaster General, along with rehab. The surgery team is great, and the rehab team very easy to work with and very thorough.
  • Absolutely amazing such nice doctors and nurses went out of there way for me highly recommend them! Thank you to all you helped me!
  • A very professional organization, with a relaxed and friendly staff.
  • Excellent experience!! I really feel like I am in great hands!! Thank you!!
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